Fratelli Rosseti

FRATELLI ROSSETTI

At Joseph Wendt Custom Clothiers, we strive to provide our clients with the highest quality, most fashionable items. We curate our showroom with the best accessories around from ties to cuff links to shoes. Especially shoes! We carry Fratelli Rossetti shoes, because we know they make the perfect pair.

These shoes are true Italian classics. The company was founded as a workshop in the late 1950s and has since grown to the well known brand it is today. But it has kept its handmade origins. It’s amazing to see a pair of shoes still crafted by a person. The level of detail in each shoe is well thought out and thoughtful. Take a look at this video of their handmade process. Once you see the craftsmanship put into just one pair of shoes, you’ll understand why they are so sought after.

The company is still family-run. It was started by Renzo Rossetti in 1953 and is now run by his sons Diego, Dario, and Luca.

If you don’t believe us, come try a pair of Fratelli Rossetti shoes for yourself! We offer a variety of styles at our Fifth Avenue Showroom so you can see the difference in quality of these shoes.


 

Are you interested in how Fratelli Rossetti makes its shoes?

LEATHER PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES 

TOLEDO

This is a technique which involves applying the colour straight onto the uppers. The colour is hand buffed onto the untreated leather, originally “blank”, creating a polished finishing effect. For the antique version, the finish is also enhanced with shading which transforms each shoe into a unique one-off.

ALL OVER

This is a special finishing process in which each part of the shoe is the same colour as the uppers. First the master artisans paint the welt with a brush, then they paint the sole edge and buff it with wax to underscore the colour; lastly, they paint the sole so it matches the other elements.
This type of production technique creates effects with different shoe models and tones, ranging from the most classic to the boldest types. It results in shoes that combine a passion for detail with the tongue-in-cheek approach of those that know how to be elegant without taking themselves too seriously.

GENESI

This is a refined, handcrafted technique which conceals the stitching so it is only visible to the keenest eyes. It is the more luxurious version of the Toledo which requires a production process made up of many stages: the eponymous “genesi” leather – a crust leather which is finished on the uppers – is treated with a special dyeing and buffing procedure, creating a shoe which is sophisticated right down to the more hidden details.

SHOE PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES

BLAKE

This is a production technique using a machine which can contemporarily sew the uppers and the insole together to ensure the sole lasts longer.
This type of technique is divided between Blake leather and Blake cowhide. The first, which ensures the shoe is flexible and light, and is therefore suitable for the summer collections, features a leather insole of minimal thickness and a natural cork covering; the second, with more structured results, requires a slightly thicker cowhide insole.

GOODYEAR

With an end to attaining the utmost resistance over the course of time, this procedure has been created to sew the welt together with the insole and uppers and then to the sole. In this way the body of the shoe is longer lasting. A cork filler is inserted into the space created by assembling these parts, making the shoe breathable and preserving the anatomy of the form and at the same time adapting it to the foot. The Goodyear technique, which has become more and more refined thanks to the use of the latest machines and materials, makes it possible to produce shoes that are well structured, comfortable and made to last the test of time.

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